TauRx Reports First Phase 3 Results for LMTX® Promising Read-Out for First-Ever Tau Aggregation Inhibitor to Enter Phase 3 Trials

TauRx Reports First Phase 3 Results for LMTX® Promising Read-Out for First-Ever Tau Aggregation Inhibitor to Enter Phase 3 Trials

  • LMTX® as monotherapy demonstrates significant reductions in disease progression in mild
    and moderate Alzheimer’s disease
  • Strong results in both cognitive and functional tests supported by brain scan evidence of slowdown in progression of pathology
  • Study misses co-primary endpoints as LMTX® as add-on therapy shows no beneficial effects
  • Initial analysis from second phase 3 study in patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease confirm
    positive findings

ABERDEEN, Scotland and SINGAPORE, 27 July 2016 – TauRx Therapeutics Ltd today announced Phase 3 clinical trial results that show treatment with LMTX®, the company’s novel tau aggregation inhibitor, had a marked beneficial effect on key measures of Alzheimer’s disease in patients with mild or moderate forms of the disease. While the TRx-237-015 study in 891 subjects failed to meet its co-primary endpoints, clinically meaningful and statistically significant reductions in the rate of disease progression were observed across three key
measures in patients who were treated with LMTX® as their only Alzheimer’s disease medication. These three key measures comprised a cognitive assessment (ADAS-Cog), a functional assessment (ADCS-ADL) and an assessment of the level of brain atrophy (lateral ventricular volume, LVV, as measured by MRI). An abstract of the results will be presented during an open session at the 2016 Alzheimer’s Association
International Conference (AAIC) in Toronto, Canada this afternoon by Dr. Serge Gauthier, CM, MD, FRCPC, Director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Unit, McGill University, Canada.

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TauRx Reports First Phase 3 Results for LMTX®

TauRx Therapeutics Ltd today announced Phase 3 clinical trial results that show treatment with LMTX®, had a marked beneficial effect on key measures of Alzheimer’s disease